ULTRA WIDE GAMING MONITORS ARE THE FUTURE

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http://www.lg.com/us/monitors/lg-34UC89G-B-ultrawide-monitor

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  1. I had the exact same monitor and returned it, pixels per inch count is worse than standard full HD so everything looks pixelated as hell. In addition, many games won't support 21:9 aspect ratio- some of them just stretch the standard ratio, others need to run windowed, others won't run at all. What is more, ultrawide monitors with decent resolution have as many pixels as a 4k screen, requiring absolute top-end cards to get even close to maximum of 100hz (1080 or 1080 Ti). Right now a much, much more logical choice is to pick a 2560×1440 standard ratio screen with a higher refresh rate. I specifically ordered both this LG Monitor and 27 inch IPS Acer Predator overclocked to 165hz. There was no competition, I returned LG with just a slight feel of regret as this massive beast of a screen looks really, really cool. But in the end, it's just not what really matters in terms of gaming performance and standard work.

  2. 6:42 I was in a very similar interaction while testing the ultra wide curved monitors (of Samsung, I think?) at Gamescom:
    Them: "Wow! I wonder if they might one day stretch it al the way around. You would feel as if you were actually in the car, that would be so cool!"
    Me: "They already have done that; it's called VR goggles…"

    And these days, an HTC Vive is a lot cheaper than this screen, at only $/€700,-. The Oculus Rift is currently even only $/€450,- if that covers your needs (especially if you only really intend to use seated applications, the Oculus is a clear winner).
    But of course, there are great applications for these huge curved screens, also in the work environment, as Sam mentions at 0:55 with Premiere, as with the current technologies, these screens offer a lot more fidelity, and less strain on the eyes.

    But at that booth at Gamescom, I couldn't help but thinking that a RACING game was about the worst kind of game they could have chosen for their demonstration…
    I wasn't really sold to VR, until the moment I played a racing game with an Oculus DK2 and a force-feedback steering wheel and pedals. It really was like sitting in the car, being able to look around, stick your head out the window, etc.
    Then, of course, a few months later, Dirk of I-Illusions showed his Space Pirate Trainer (then-)demo at Screenshake festival in Antwerp, on his HTC Vive Pre, and my mind was blown. 😀

  3. Would it be too much to ask for you guys to try out "Undead development"? It's basically a vr zombie game where you travel around the area collecting stuff such as ammo and weapons, and even boards and planks that you can use to barricade up stuff from wave after wave of zombies!

  4. They're the future, and great IF your game works well on ultrawide, doesn't just cut off top and/or bottom as on some games, doesn't give you the choice of stretch out of proportion, fisheye FoV, just plain crop the top view while offering zero advantage on side periphery (Overwatch is Underwatch, on ultrawides), or have those black bars to enjoy, effectively giving you the viewing real estate of a much lesser size 16:9 monitor, among other things. So yea, they're the future which may be the standard by the time you're ready for another ultrawide monitor when the industry support is better, at which time the monitors of the actual future will be better anyways. The monitors are presently here, but the future hasn't quite arrived to be displayed on them as industry-wide as you'd hope. Excellent for some games though.

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